composite helmets index

UNKNOWN

Some so-far unidentified composite helmets - if you can supply information contact us here

HELMET MOULD - probably UK origin.

"This is a mould for an unknown experimental combat helmet. It was found with other manufacturing parts and miscellaneous army (British) surplus during clearance of a container os - according to the seller - british military surplus from the 1970s and '80s.

It consists of a heavy inner (male) section and a lighter but larger female base. A shape is visible around the edge of the male section and this mirrors the top edge of the base unit. Both parts have a ridge running front to back which would have been visible in any finished product.

The base unit has a small hole leading to a larger circular opening and this in turn is surrounded by remnants of foam - this may suggest that suction was used in the moulding process. The parts are clearly marked "helmet" but there is a possibility that this was used to create an inner skullcap-type liner piece."

ADRIAN BLAKE

IMG_9280.jpg

Label reads - "HELMET, COMBAT, LIGHTWEIGHT EXPERIMENTAL. TOOL PART FEMALE 4578961"

IMG_9285.jpg

Label reads - "HELMET, COMBAT, LIGHTWEIGHT EXPERIMENTAL. TOOL PART FEMALE 4578961"

IMG_9298.jpg

Label reads - "HELMET, COMBAT, LIGHTWEIGHT EXPERIMENTAL. TOOL PART FEMALE 4578961"

IMG_9281.jpg

IMG_9299.jpg

Label reads - ""HELMET, COMBAT, LIGHTWEIGHT EXPERIMENTAL. TOOL PART MALE 4578961"

IMG_9283.jpg

Label reads - ""HELMET, COMBAT, LIGHTWEIGHT EXPERIMENTAL. TOOL PART MALE 4578961"

IMG_9293.jpg

IMG_9294.jpg

IMG_9287.jpg

IMG_9296.jpg

IMG_9286.jpg

IMG_9291.jpg

"There's a base ("female") section which is smooth and pretty much feature-less. There's also a much heavier shaped "male" piece which fits inside. I suspect the helmet material was sheet/weave-based and pliable...laid over or into the base section and the top was pressed in...I don't think the substance, whatever it was, was poured in although I guess it could have been (there are two very small holes in the bottom of the base piece which could be drain-holes but I'd expect the base to have evidence of run-off). The holes may perhaps have been for suction? Whilst the male piece is very heavy for its size and really quite robust the base piece is much lighter and doesn't appear capable of taking a lot of pressure.

I'm starting to wonder if it was used to make a helmet liner / hard skull-cap piece as I can't think of any helmet that's ridged front-to-back in the crown except the Brit lightweight RAF loaders helmet used as a bump helmet by some SF....but they are ridged on the OUTSIDE too and the female section is smooth."

 

UNKNOWN  - possibly Chinese commercial ?

Acquired from a Dutch collector in 2012, there is no known information about this helmet. The vendor says he bought it from a  militaria dealer in early 2012. The only marking of any kind is 'SCT-M-7'

From its general appearance and characteristics it is suspected to be one of very many Chinese commercial products, but many hours of looking through Chinese trade websites have given no real answer. Might not be Chinese at all, of course!

Particularly notable is an extremely unusual ratchet-bar as part of the chinstrap assembly.

Greg Pickersgill

DSCN3166.JPG

DSCN3177.JPG

DSCN3179.JPG

DSCN3172.JPG

DSCN3180.JPG

DSCN3173.JPG

DSCN3174.JPG

DSCN3176.JPG

 

Unusual Gallet helmet.

Offered for identification by Richard Jones -

"... was bought as a French F2 and is obviously made by Gallet but I don't think it is an F2 - very lightweight, almost feels like plastic, and has a clip in mesh liner system."

DSCF0009.jpg

DSCF0010.jpg

DSCF0003.jpg

DSCF0004.jpg

DSCF0006.jpg

DSCF0011.jpg

DSCF0005.jpg

DSCF0008.jpg

DSCF0007.jpg

 

 

Three more Unidentified Composites from Richard Jones. All were acquired via Ebay around 2006, so obviously predate that time.

A number of composite collectors have seen these pictures and have not been able to ID them - can you do better?

UNKNOWN 1 (3).jpg

UNKNOWN 1 (1).jpg

 

 

UNKNOWN 1 (2).jpg

UNKNOWN 1 (4).jpg

 

 

UNKNOWN 1 (5).jpg

UNKNOWN 1 (6).jpg

UNKNOWN 1 (7).jpg

NB - there is a suspicion that this 'JSF'-badged example is actually some sort of export RBR product. But no proof!

 

A probable test/trials helmet, sourced from Belgium (which may have no significance).

NB - the shells of this helmet and the one immediately below are NOT identical.

DSCN2892.JPG

DSCN2893.JPG

Letter 'C' on front, written in marker-pen.

DSCN2894.JPG

The notation here is a repeat of a size stamp found inside the shell.

DSCN2895.JPG

The only other marking in the shell or liner is '06/94' which might be a date.

DSCN2897.JPG

Chincup is marked 'Made in England'.

DSCN2896.JPG

 

Photographs supplied by Greg Pickersgill

 

Another probable test/trials helmet, sourced from a dealer in Belgium as above.
The back-story was scant, the dealer reported only that the helmets were part of a militaria collection bought for re-sale.

DSCN2911.JPG

Note letter 'B' on front, apparently in the same hand as the 'C' on the above helmet.

DSCN2908.JPG

No other markings of any kind on either helmet, chinstrap, or liner

DSCN2907.JPG

DSCN2898.JPG

DSCN2900.JPG

DSCN2909.JPG

Not obvious from this picture, but the chinstrap is in three parts, with a catch as shown below on each end on the middle element.

DSCN2910.JPG

DSCN2902.JPG

DSCN2906.JPG

DSCN2905.JPG

 

Photographs supplied by Greg Pickersgill

 

Probable commercial helmet (but perhaps not, see following), well-used, has previous owner's initials on sweatband.

No other markings of any kind on shell or liner.

NB - shell appears to have been originally finished in dark green, and the outside has been painted black later.

Possible identification - this helmet could (not certain) be a Chinese QGF-03 as shown here.
Apart from the similarit of shell and interior rig (but no PLA markings) there is the legend 'Bei Xing' found on an interior plastic fitting.
Any confirmation or denial appreciated!

DSCN2924.JPG

DSCN2927.JPG

DSCN2925.JPG

DSCN2926.JPG

DSCN2921.JPG

DSCN2922.JPG

DSCN2923.JPG

Photographs supplied by Greg Pickersgill