composite helmets index

UNITED KINGDOM

HELMET, PARACHUTISTS, LIGHT WEIGHT
HELMET, PARACHUTE

There has been some confusion as to the proper designation of this UK paratroop helmet; it is variously known as simply the 'British Para' or - certainly incorrectly - as the M76 (after 1976, a supposed year of general introduction). The earliest models, made by Thetford Moulded Products, have a label that reads "HELMET, PARACHUTISTS, Light Weight", but after production was taken over my NPAerospace by the late 1980s this became more simply 'HELMET, PARACHUTE'

DSCN2698.JPG

UK PARA LABEL 1998.JPG

2002_01010036.JPG

There appear to be three variants - the earliest version has a smooth surface to the shell, and usually has bare-metal liner bolts. This shell is simply fibre-glass and offers no ballistic protection.

2002_01010029.JPG

The shape of the shell remains the same with later production runs, but the surface is textured. Also the liner bolts have been given a plastic coating. These rough-textured shells are made of a ballistically-resistant material.

2002_01010041.JPG

An early example in full regalia - the camo and net  are taped on. Investigation has shown, however, that the shell is smooth, so therefore an early production example.

2002_01010035.JPG

Early production shell, with bare-metal bolts.

2002_01010032.JPG

The basic liner appears to remain the same in all cases - a cloth surround, four plastic lobes with an adjustable cord. The shell is actually made up in two parts - the outer 'ballistic plastic'  (nylon fibre as in the Mk6 ?) and an inner lining, which appears to be nothing more than expanded polystyrene.

2002_01010033.JPG

The white 'polystyrene' inner shell is just about visible here.

2002_01010039.JPG

The inner shell has been removed from this example - replaced by two first-field-dressings (really) - but this photograph does not clearly show the inside of the BP shell because of reflection.

2002_01010031.JPG

Liner-bolt, plastic coated.

2002_01010043.JPG

The most significant differences are in the chinstraps - this is the earliest Thetford-produced model.

2002_01010046.JPG

A similar - if not identical - chinstrap system is used on another helmet by Thetford Moulded Products - see 'Northern Ireland' helmet below.

2002_01010045.JPG

2002_01010044.JPG

2002_01010042.JPG

2002_01010028.JPG

2002_01010037.JPG

This is the second version - a simple three-point harness with the chinstrap fastening through two tension-loops at about ear-level

2002_01010038.JPG

This would appear to be an awkward fastening method.

2002_01010034.JPG

Some users have improved the awkward chinstrap fastening by simply replacing the entire chinstrap with that from the GS Mk6 helmet, as shown here.

Richard Jones comments - "...done for 1 of 2 reasons - 1 by Paras as it was a much better chinstrap/easier to open, close and adjust than the issue strap; 2 by non-Para squaddies who have acquired Para helmets due to various reasons and have fitted the MK6 chinstrap in order to try to hide the fact from angry RSMs that they are wearing a Para and not their issue M6 Helmet!"

2002_01010030.JPG

 

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

THETFORD HELMET, PARACHUTISTS, Light Weight

"An early model shell/liner, which has had its originalvinyl straps replaced with the later version, as was the case with many of these. It is still identifiable as an early product by the white browpad (Yes, it really is white) and smooth shiny shell. The interior of the shell itself is entirely unremarkable - no embossing, no stamps, no label, no nothing. There is a curious rectangle of surfacing missing at the crown, though whether that has any significance is unknown.

The liner is just an expanded polystyrene shell with a couple of cork infills which can be broken out for using earphones. It is just amazingly cheap and nasty in every sense. What was a surprise was finding the Thetford label on the liner itself."

DSCN3694.jpg

DSCN3693.jpg

DSCN3695.jpg

DSCN3698.jpg

DSCN3696.jpg

DSCN3697.jpg

DSCN3699.jpg

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

Mk6 - the General Service helmet from the early 1980s until the early 21st century.

HPIM7304.JPG

HPIM7247.JPG

HPIM7248.JPG

HPIM7268.JPG

MkVI i.JPG

HPIM7270.JPG

 

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

For more photographs, see Joseba's webpage here.

 

Mk6 - some details of the liner

The liner of this helmet is not often seen by collectors, as the only way of removing it is essentially destructive. The main fixing of the liner is by two rubber rivets thrust through the liner and shell from the inside. The rubber rivets are one-way only, and when the liner/shell sandwich has been made the only way of withdrawing the rivet is to completely cut off flush the two small 'horns' that are seen at the top rear of the helmet. The bad part of this is that once cut the rubber rivets at the rear cannot be replaced. As you will see below the rivets when unused are coinsiderably longer than necessary, as they have to be drawn (with some substantial effort) through the liner/shell sandwich. The excess is then cut off.

DSCN2641.JPG

Liner, side view; it is mostly polystyrene with some fabric padding

DSCN2642.JPG

Rear view, the holes for the rubber rivets can be seen above the green fabric band.

DSCN2643.JPG

Another rear view.

DSCN2644.JPG

Top rear of helmet shell showing holes from which the rivets have been withdrawn.

DSCN2647.JPG

The rubber rivets; the British Army spares number is CN8415 99 130 6035 Rivet Mk6. They have to be pushed into the liner/shell sandwich and then tightened by simply pulling with a pair of pliers; I say 'simply' but it does sound quite difficult. Then the protruding spikes are cut to suit.

DSCN2648.JPG

The rivets are black flexible rubber, overall 1+3/4 inches or 45mm long, the head 3/4 inch or 20mm across, length from head to midpoint one-way collar is just over half an inch or 15mm. They appear to be excluvely an NP Aerospace spare part, used only for their helmets, as no trace of them as a commercial product available to the public has been found.

DSCN2651.JPG

Head of rivet shown as in the liner.

DSCN2652.JPG

Stalk protruding from liner, this would have been set into the shell, with another several millimetres protruding as the well-known 'horns'.

DSCN2663.JPG

Comparison of new rivet (left) with rivet removed from helmet after having 'horn' cut off to allow removal.

DSCN2654.JPG

The rarely-seen date/size/makers moulding in the crown of a Mk6.

DSCN2655.JPG

Empty shell.

DSCN2650.JPG

LES TIPPETT was extraordinarily kind in passing on to me a Mk6 that had been sliced through from back to front.

DSCN2653.JPG

Cut shell without liner.

DSCN2649.JPG

The shell and liner must have been cut separately as the edges do not match perfectly.

A posting about the Mk6 found on the forum at the ARRSE website -

"Having been shown around the factory where they are made, I was told that they have an indefinite service life. As mentioned above, as long as the composite is not cracked (and believe me, this is pretty hard to do) they will pretty much last for ever. The liners do wear out of course and if you exchange yours with the RQMS, it will eventually find its way back to the factory for refurbishment and then re-issue. When I visited, there was a great big bin of them waiting to be worked on. My guide, who was a bit of a self-proclaimed Mk6 spotter, could recognise the date of manufacture from the codes on the inside. He proudly showed me one from the first year of manufacture, which he said would be good as new once it had been refurbished."

 album.jpg

Bisected Mk6.

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

with special thanks to Les Tippett and Raj Khoria.

 

Mk 6 - some more points of information

The actual date of introduction of the Mk6 is a subject of some discussion; at this point there is no absolutely known date for its first issue or first use on active service. It is known, for example, that the Light Weight Parachutists helmet was used on active service in the Falklands/Malvinas war, and it is also know that a number of other ballistic plastic/composite type helmets were trialled around that the time, but no firm date for introduction of the Mk6 has been established.

To demonstate the problem, here are some proposed dates from usually reliable sources;
1982 (CASQUES DE COMBAT, article by Marcus Cotton),
1982 (Joseba Revuelda, website),
1982 (World War Helmets, website),
1984 (Marzetti, ELMETTI),
"...from 1986" (Wikipedia),
1987 (Martin Brayley, TIN HATS TO COMPOSITE HELMETS).

From that it would seem 1982 is highly likely, but someone may know better. And indeed someone might; RICHARD AIXILL, in email correspondence, points to this Written Answer in HANSARD -

COMBAT HELMETS HC Deb 21 January 1986 vol 90

Mr. Warren  asked the Secretary of State for Defence what are his plans for the purchase of resin bonded fibre combat helmets; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Lee  First issues of the new Mk 6 combat helmet, which is constructed in resin-bonded fibre, were made in 1985 and will continue over the next seven years until all relevant areas of the services are equipped with it.

Which certainly provides a good fixed waypoint to hinge any argument around!

The earliest dated Mk6 I have is shown here. Note that it is the early-type smooth light green finish. It is also comparatively light compared to a later production model - 1294g compared to 1458g (NB - the 1983-84 example is missing its chinstrap but that would not account for the whole disparity of weight).

Notice also that this 1983-84 model does not have the two pre-prepared fixing holes for a visor as is usual in later production models, and that appears normal for all pre-NP-produced Mk6.

Another surprising point from RICHARD AIXILL -

"I recently purchased an unused 1987 mk6. This helmet is still in its original box (National Plastics) with the plastic bag and contemporary DPM cover. One special aspect is that the serial number on the box and the helmet match - I didn't realise that mk6 helmets had an individually serialised number."

Certainly NP helmets always seem to have a serial, but it is surprising that that extended to the packaging as well. Worth noting that none of the NEI, the TRITON OLIVER or the RBR have serials.

There is also some small mystery about when the surface texture transformed from smooth to rough. The latest dated smooth shell I have is 1986, and the earliest rough shell is label dated 1988/89. There is a bit of a problem with accurate dating because many helmets have lost their manufacturers labels and dating is then difficult without taking out the liner and seeing what is embossed on the inside of the shell - and that of course is a problem because there is no umlimited supply of CN8415 99 130 6035 Rivet Mk6 to put the liners back in again!

An interesting piece of background, again from RICHARD AIXILL -

"I am a serious collector of 1980’s period British military equipment. This interest stems from my own military service in the (Regular) British Army 1982-1988.

I have some direct knowledge about the introduction of the MK6 helmet and I have also undertaken some research on the subject. From 1984 to 1986 I was based at Warminster IDB (Infantry Demonstration Battalion). Here we often worked with the ITDU (Infantry Trials and Development Unit). ITDU were an organisation fundamentally involved with the development and introduction of new equipment for the infantry and the army as a whole. Some of the equipment items I used at ITDU included trials and early versions of the MK VI helmet. These helmets were very similar to the final MK VI - having only minor design differences. Ballistic nylon composite helmets were undergoing user trials at this time and they were evident during the major BAOR exercise - Lionheart 84 - by elements of the 1st Battalion Irish Guards (note 1).

The new composite material helmet was intended to replace the MK IV steel helmet. Research for this new helmet is suggested to have stemmed from developments to equipment used by the army in Northern Ireland (note.2). However, it is also possible that a trial (un-adopted) version of the composite helmet was titled MK V.

Development upon new types of a ballistic Helmet, of varying designs, are suggested to have been conducted during in the late 1970’s - for a recognisable MK VI  design was later listed for user trials to begin during 1981 (note.2). An extended later trial, of 1000 units, probably accounts for the MK VI examples dated 1983/4 manufactured by NEI Electronics LTD (note.5) .

The MK VI design having been accepted for service, issue commenced with a pre-production run of 6,000 (this included issue to elements of 5 Airborne Brigade) (note. 5). This was then followed by the wider general issue, most likely commencing in mid to late 1985 (note. 5). I myself was issued my first MK VI in March 1986 whilst on attachment in Northern Ireland (issue to troops stationed in the province began sometime immediately prior). New equipment at this time was usually first issued to BAOR and NI troops then UK based Infantry followed by other units. Full scale issue continued over the next couple of years.

The main production run of MK VI helmets was completed by NP (National Plastics). National Plastics were at this time part of the Courtaulds Group. The company subsequently changed its name to NP Aerospace and latterly Morgan Advanced Materials. The manufacturing facility has remained throughout at Foleshill Road Coventry (note 6).

Note 1. Ref. Soldier Magazine 5/11/84
Note.2 Ref. Soldier Magazine 04/81
Note.3 Ref. TNA WO 352/68 ‘Physiological Trials of the Modified 1956 pattern liner for the British Helmet MK 4’. 1960. And TNA ref. WO352/47 ‘Comparative Physiological Trial of a new issue Helmet Liner of theBritish Steel Helmet MKIV’. 1956
Note.4 Ref. TNA WO 291/1893 The Need for a New Design of Battle Helmet for the Army. 1953
Note.5 Ref. Soldier Magazine 6/06/85
Note.6 Ref.  http://www.morgancomposites.com/resources/brochures-and-literature/ "

Shown below is the instruction leaflet as issued with the Mk6. It is interesting to note that it explicitly says the new helmet "replaces the steel Mk4" with no reference to the Mk5. Which may seem reasonable as the actual shells of the Mk4 and Mk5 are identical and interchangeable and fitted with the Lift-the-dot liner pin, the only difference being the liner itself.

img543.jpg

img545.jpg

 

Two examples of a very early version of the Mk6 - possibly that known as the PM-6.
These are - amazingly - Thetford-made helmets that were very probably part of the early 1980s trials (of up to 17 variants?) that concluded with the introduction of the production Mk6, typified by the most well-known NP Aerospace production runs. It is perhaps not so surprising that Thetford was involved as they were already engaged with production of the early versions of the
"HELMET, PARACHUTISTS, Light Weight" (see above).
There are very noticeable, and genuinely surprising differences; these helmets have a front liner retetion pin in addition to the two rear pins on the production helmets, and the chinstrap rig is a simple single-piece with chincup. There are other less obvious differences also.

UNITED KINGDOM THETFORD MK6 (2).jpg

Side/top view

UNITED KINGDOM THETFORD MK6 (3).jpg

Rear - two liner retaining pins in similar layout as on a common Mk6.

UNITED KINGDOM THETFORD MK6 (4).jpg

Front - see single liner-retaining stud, not on any later production Mk6!

UNITED KINGDOM THETFORD MK6 (5).jpg

The four holes may (not so certain) be for an visor fitting. See note at end of this block.
See below for a helmet without the holes.

UNITED KINGDOM THETFORD MK6 (6).jpg

UNITED KINGDOM THETFORD MK6 (1).jpg

Note that there are two fabric straps running laterally front-back, part of the liner structure not continued in production models.

thetford mk6 details (1).jpg

Rear liner pins - similar in layout and form to the common Mk6 - but definitely not the same 'rubber mushroom' rivet.

thetford mk6 details (2).jpg

Front liner pin - this is actually a different kind of object to the rear studs - see below for a disassembled example of this helmet.

thetford mk6 details (3).jpg

Rear pins exterior

thetford mk6 details (4).jpg

Front pin exterior.

UNITED KINGDOM THETFORD MK6 (7).jpg

Photographs supplied by
RICHARD JONES

Another example - disassembled, showing liner and details of liner retention pins.

THETFORD MK6 JC (3).jpg

The front liner pin shows clearly here.

THETFORD MK6 JC (4).jpg

No holes at lateral comms bulge - was this the normal factory-finish state?

THETFORD MK6 JC (1).jpg

The chinstrap - with plastic chincup - is a simple one-piece fabric strap surprisngly similar to those used on the Mk 4/5

THETFORD MK6 JC (2).jpg

Thetford liner label is for a "Helmet, Combat, G.S. Mk6"

THETFORD MK6 JC (8).jpg

THETFORD MK6 JC (9).jpg

THETFORD MK6 JC (6).jpg

THETFORD MK6 JC (7).jpg

THETFORD MK6 JC (5).jpg

Liner pins - the two white are the rear, the dark the front.

THETFORD MK6 JC (11).jpg

Shell without liner.

THETFORD MK6 JC (10).jpg

Chinstrap - simple fabric strap with plastic chincup. On this example (is it typical?) the strap seems to be unnecessarily long.

THETFORD MK6 JC (12).jpg

As well as the Thetford label on the liner this Texolex sticker was found in the interior of the shell.

This website (a very interesting one covering the Falklands/Malvinas War) has an interesting reference to what may be another of these pre-production helmets - claimed to have been trialled during the 1982 conflict http://militariamalvinas.forumcommunity.net/?t=55103480

Also, from my notes, Canadian collector Roger Lucy has said - "According to a timeline on the development of the Mk.6 that I have buried away somewhere, Britain began the search for a new combat helmet in August 1968. The initial requirement was for a common design suited for infantry, paratroopers and AFV crew. By May 1971, it was realized that this was unfeasible and a separate requirement for a new infantry helmet was issued. Six different prototypes were then tested between 1975 and 1978 and contracts for the first 1500
helmets for troop trials were issued in 1979. In November 1982 the Mk.6 was accepted for production, subject to adoption of a three point chin-strap. Pilot production began in 1982 and first issue (to the 5th Airborne Brigade) was in late 1984. The regular army and the Territorials were completely re-equipped by 1990."

It has also been said, with some authority that "the PM6 or Pilot Model Mk6 was the original troop trial version of the MK6 helmet. There were 1500 made and each one is individually numbered. There were 300 of them fitted with IS visors ... ...during 1978 limited trials were made of PM 6 including visor attachment for Internal Security use. Larger trials were planned in 1979 and quantities fixed at 1500 of which 300 were to have Internal Security visors. Contracts were placed during the same year and major trials were undertaken during July 1981. In November 1982, the PM 6 was accepted subject to the modification of the chin strap to a three point pattern and the helmet designated GS Mk.6. Contracts for pilot production of the GS Mk6 were placed during 1983 with six manufacturers each to supply 1000 helmets. Monitored issue of the GS Mk6 was undertaken by 5th Airborne Brigade during Exercise 'Lionheart'. contracts for the IS visors and kit were placed during January 1985."

Please note that both examples shown here are numbered; Richard Jones' example is numbered 956 and James C's is numbered 600.

Photographs supplied by
JAMES C

 

MK6 - early edition by NEI ELECTRONICS - dated 1983-84

DSCN3664.jpg

DSCN3663.jpg

DSCN3662.jpg

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

DSCN3158.JPG

DSCN3163.JPG

DSCN3161.JPG

 Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

Mk6 - early edition by TRITON OLIVER -  very rarely seen maker - dated 1984

DSCN3656.jpg

DSCN3657.jpg

DSCN3658.jpg

DSCN3659.jpg

TRITON OLIVER LTD seem to have been active in the West Midlands (England) up until the middle 1990s when they closed down or were absorbed into something other. They were in the plastics moulding business apart from anything else, and were obviously one of the other few companies like NEI who produced early runs of the GS Mk6.

Anyway, this is pretty much a Mk6 EXCEPT for the the fact that like other very early runs from NEI and perhaps indeed the main contractor NP, it does not have the extra breakthrough holes on the side-wings for the face-shield brackets.

A weight comparison with this and a much later NP Mk 6 shows the Triton Oliver is actually 40g lighter.

While weighing this Triton Oliver and having it placed it upside down it was noticed that it did not roll around or settle at an angle as do many other examples that were then tested. This implies perhaps that the top of the shell is somewhat flatter than later production helmets. Whether this is an accident or an actual variation resulting from Triton Oliver production practices is another question.

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

Mk6 - early edition, probably by TRITON OLIVER, although all labels have been removed.  

This example has had its liner removed.

DSCN3819.jpg

DSCN3812.jpg

DSCN3813.jpg

DSCN3815.jpg

DSCN3816.jpg

DSCN3817.jpg

DSCN3818.jpg

"This is the embossed moulding in the crown of the shell. "132-5611' is part of the NSN for this haelmet component. The 'H' is of unknown significance, perhaps a batch or mould identifer. "T.O.S.P." is also unproven, but a reasonable guess is that it identifies a TRITON-OLIVER product, in the same way that the letters 'NP' appear in the same place in shells made by National Plastics.

Just by the moulding, shown in the photograph above right, is a small white sticker which has 'No. 188' handwritten on it. The other T-O helmet shown above has the number '144' handwritten on its label next to the manufacturer's name. This may indicate an actual production serial number, which may in turn indicate that T-O produced only a very small number of Mk6 helmets."

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

Mk6 produced by RBR - an uncommon label for this helmet. Dated 1994

Indistinguishable from any other Mk6 except for the label!

DSCN3665.jpg

DSCN3667.jpg

DSCN3671.jpg

DSCN3670.jpg

 

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

Mk6 with nape shield

The padded shield is held by a strip of velcro glued into the inside rear of the helmet.
The chincup may be an individual modification, or issued with the nape shield - details unknown at present.
Given that the blind rivets at the side have been removed this helmet may have had a faceshield fitted at some time.

DSCN2990.JPG

DSCN2991.JPG

DSCN2992.JPG

DSCN2994.JPG

DSCN2993.JPG

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

Mk6 - tested in Canada

GS Mk6 LETE 84 test left.jpg

GS Mk6 LETE 84 test right.jpg

GS Mk6 LETE 84 test in.jpg

Photographs supplied by
ROGER LUCY

 

Mk6A -un upgraded version of the Mk6, with increased protective qualities.

Introduced in the first decade of the 21stC during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The shell is virtually identical to the Mk6. All Mk6A helmets are black. The helmet is distinctly heavier than the Mk6. The liner is also different, reported by real users to be much more comfortable than the Mk6. The Mk6A iss issued with a black finish only - any other colour apparent in photos is an artefact.

UK Mk6 large = 1452g
UK Mk6A large = 1628g

DSCN1254.jpg

UK3.jpg

UK4.jpg

DSCN0980.JPG

DSCN0985.JPG

DSCN0984.JPG.

UK6.jpg

UK7.jpg

UK5.jpg

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

Mk6A - field conversion with para liner

DSCN2688.JPG

DSCN2689.JPG

DSCN2690.JPG

DSCN2692.JPG

Acquired via eBay, this is a one-off conversion - showing much sign of use - of a Mk6a shell fitted with a paratroop liner and chinstrap. Best of both worlds?

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

COURTAULDS AEROSPACE NP6

This helmet was obtained from Sweden.

At first look this appears to be a more or less normal Mk6. But it is definately not. It is white. It has a black rim applied. It is heavy.

DSCN3573.jpg

DSCN3575.jpg

DSCN3574.jpg

DSCN3576.jpg

The applied rim, either rubber or plastic, difficult to tell. Not seen before on any version of the Mk6. One might wonder why it is black on an otherwise white helmet, but then of course one wonders why it is there at all.

DSCN3569.jpg

DSCN3570.jpg

DSCN3571.jpg

All interior fixtures and fittings are exactly was would be expected in a standard Mk6.

DSCN3572.jpg

The white is not obviously an amateur/end-user applied coat of white paint. It is crisp and even and virtually certainly a spray-painted factory application. To check whether it was a white paint or whether (perhaps even more amazingly) it had been moulded from white material, a small amount of scraping was done, and the paint was difficult to remove. You can see the typical Mk6 green under the white, proving that the original moulding was green as for a standard Mk6.

DSCN3577.jpg

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

And it is heavy! Really heavy. It is a medium size (as shown on both the label and the liner insert), and compared to a medium Mk6 it appears the same size, and yet it weighs a substantial 1786g. That's a massive increase over a standard late production medium Mk6 which is 1392g, and a more or less 200g more than a medium Mk6A which is 1592g. That's a lot, and while the edge-strip which is not present on either the 6 or 6A must add some weight it can't possibly explain the increase.

The label is interesting too; as you can see the manufacturer is shown as COURTAULDS AEROSPACE, not the most common 6 or 6A maker National Plastics (NP Aerospace). This is interesting in the context of Sweden (where it came from, remember) because the Swedish Hjalm 90 was originally produced by Courtaulds and badged with their name as manufacturer. There may be a link here. Whatever it may be it seems unlikely that it was a competitor to the Hjalm 90, as this label is dated 1995, which I believe is well after the initial production and issue of the Hjalm 90.

The model number given on the label is NP6, about which I can find no information. It also has a NATO stock number which seems to read 13387-017 and which shows up as a sort of push-button assembly, so obviously some mistake. I did try 13367-017 but no result at all there. There's also a serial number for this particular helmet, which is 8. Now that could mean nothing at all, but I do wonder whether there was a very short production run.

As it came from Sweden there is a suggestion that it might be a trials helmet for another nation in the region; it was suggested that Finland had at some point trialled the Mk6 but again the date of this white object is after the introduction of the locally-made Komposiittikypara K92, fielded in the early 1990s.  The only information the Swedish seller could offer was that he believed it had been used in Somalia in the 1990s.

Unusual as the NP6 model is, there is at least one other NP6, which is in most ways similar. It is not white, but it has an applied rim over the usual moulded Mk6 edging. The interior fixtures and fittings (not shown here) are as one would expect in a standard Mk6. It was listed as being a 'special purpose' or trials helmet.

Apart from the visor - and being green rather than white - it is clearly very similar to the white one.

No idea of the weight.

Pictures taken from Ebay. 

7.JPG6.JPG

I had contacted the seller about the label and he was kind enough to supply information:-

There are two labels, one says:

Nato number: (unfilled)

Serial: 280950

Batch No: 6/941

NATIONAL PLASTICS COVENTRY, UK

-- 

The second one

Product: NP6/I/L

V 50 Std. 17

grain trag : 520

 

NP PECOC model - compare and contrast with the Mk7 below.

PECOC profile.jpg

PECOC 3_4.jpg

PECOC front.jpg

PECOC rear.jpg

PECOC rivets.jpg

PECOC inner.jpg

PECOC inner rear.jpg

PECOC label.jpg

 

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

"This British helmet was part of the “PECOC” (Personal Equipment Common Operating Clothing) project and presumably lost out to the Mk7 to be the next (current) combat helmet although a "Soldier Systems" article seems to suggest that the Mk7 is an interim solution. PECOC was originally scheduled for Operational Deployment in 2011 (this helmet is dated 2009), having been at Assessment stage in late 2010 – the intention was to replace the ’95 style kit in use building on the learnings from operational theatre (presumably GW1).

It looks like PECOC encompassed clothing (style and camo), load carrying equipment, helmets and light weaponry. From the outside this helmet looks like a Mk7 / MICH hybrid, being the same colour and thickness of the Mk7 but having a much steeper rear and less flared side sections. Whilst the strap is the same as the Mk7, the liner system is very different, consisting of a shaped inner skull-cap with 2 moveable Velcro-backed pads (there may have been more)."

This example was made by National Plastics, is size “small” and weighs 1.3kg

http://soldiersystems.net/tag/pecoc/ 

http://www.deagel.com/news/UK-MoD-Unveils-Future-Personal-Equipment-and-Common-Operational-Clothing-for-British-Infantrymen_n000007703.aspx 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wiCY8J9510 

 

NP PECOC

Pe 2 front side.jpg

Pe 2 front.jpg

Pe 2 side.jpg

Pe 2 NVG mount.jpg

Pe 2 inner.jpg

Pe 2 label.jpg

"Trial NVG bracket attached to the front. The liner differs from that in the PECOC illustrated above and is more like a Mk6 one in appearance except for the ridges running across it."

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

NP PECOC variant liner

PECOC 001.JPG

PECOC 002.JPG

PECOC Liner 001.JPG

PECOC 004.JPG

PECOC 005.JPG

PECOC liner pad_rear.jpg

PECOC inner 1.jpg

PECOC inner 2.jpg

 

Photographs supplied by
STEVE SHEPPARD

 

Mk7 - see also NP AEROSPACE AC900 immediately below

The Mk7 was introduced in 2009; it was originally believed to be an off-the-shelf version of the pre-existing NP Aerospace AC600/900,  not a new design.

 Mk73.JPG

Mk71.JPG

Mk72.JPG

Mk74.JPG

Mk79.JPG

Mk76.JPG

 Mk78.JPG

The Left-hand element of the chinstrap has been broken and field-repaired with medical tape.
There should be another plastic adjustable buckle as seen on the Right strap.

Mk710.jpg

Right-hand chinstrap element, showing buckle which should be present also on the Left.

Mk713.JPG

Note that the chinstrap has two pop-stud connectors, one at each end, different to the single pop-stud on the Mk6 and 6A

Mk714.JPG

The net in the crown can be adjusted slightly by shifting this velcro band which lies underneath it. Adjustment is not easy.

Mk711.JPG

Mk77.JPG

Mk715.JPG

This pad at the rear of the chinstrap rigging appears to function as some sort of steadying-point, fitting at the nape.

Mk716.JPG

The pad has to be pulled down very firmly when putting on the helmet or it becomes jammed into the rear interior pad  and may be uncomfortable.

This example of the Mk7 is a Large size, and weighs 1466g.
By comparison (weight of my own examples)
UK Mk6 large = 1452g
UK Mk6A large = 1628g
Swedish Hjalm 90 medium = 1345g
German 828 size 52-59, (medium?) = 1522g
Polish Wz-2005 (medium?) = 1528g .

Mk75.JPGMk75.JPG

 

Photographs supplied by
Greg Pickersgill

 

NP AEROSPACE  AC900

"This is the British AC900 made by NP Aerospace. According to the label, it was made in 2005 and has a low serial number (obscured) which suggests that it was one of the first few made. This helmet is clearly the forerunner to the MkVII introduced in 2009. I can only assume that, during trials, the 3 point harness arrangement (similar to the MkVI) proved inadequate and the design was changed as a result. These photographs have been taken from the same angles as those taken of the MkVII on this site to enable a direct comparison to be made. It would be hard to say that the differences between the two helmets are numerous but they ARE noticeable. The key differences are:-

- colour - the AC900 is black - the MkVII is sand-yellow (one can only assume this will change as/when Operations change)

- the 900 has a 3 point harness whilst the the MkVII has a 5 point harness arrangement

- the straps on the 900 are black and man-made material - those on the MkVII are green and appear to be more akin to traditional webbing

- the fastenings on the harness are different

- the 900 has a paper makers label behind the rear head pad

 It has been suggested that these AC900 and the Mk7 are the same helmet - clearly the shell and the inner appear to be the same but the harness (+ associated catches, buckles etc) and the shell colour makes the 900 a different helmet. This particular example has minor surface scratching to the outer shell but appears to be unissued - internally it is in mint condition"

AC900 left R.jpg

AC900 right R.jpg

AC900 front R.jpg

AC900 rear R.jpg

AC900 inner R.jpg

AC900 inner 7 R.jpg

AC900 inner 3 R.jpg

AC900 inner 4 R.jpg

AC900 inner 5 R.jpg

AC900 inner 2 R.jpg

AC900 inner 6 R.jpg

AC900 inner 8 R.jpg

AC900 NP label R.jpg

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

Mk73.JPG AC900 right R.jpg

Mk715.JPGAC900 inner 4 R.jpg

AC900 SHELL STAMP.JPG

Something rarely seen, the size/date/serial moulding in the crown of an AC900 shell, hidden by the liner.
Photograph supplied by RICHARD JONES

 

NP AC902

"This is the AC902 from National Plastics. To the untrained eye it's just another Mk7 or AC900 variant. The key differences are:- 

- The liner piece is not held in place by long thin black rubber "pegs" that pierce the rear of the shell of the MkVII and the 900 (and of course the Mk6) although the liner itself retains the holes for them - it's not (yet) clear how the liner is held in place

- The strap has been revised to enable it to be undone and the helmet removed without causing additional spine trauma in the case of injury - a new buckle exists each side to release the strap

- A new padded nape piece fits across the rear of the straps

- The harness has 4 attaching points and not 5 as per the MkVII

- It's black....not "sand"

This "medium" example weighs 1.48kg

IMG_21311.jpg IMG_21321.jpg
IMG_21331.jpg IMG_21391.jpg
IMG_21431.jpg IMG_21361.jpg
IMG_21421.jpg

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

NP AC902

from another example of the 902, which has a loose liner (intentionally by actual user, or because the glue failed, the world may never know) - at the very least it resolves the question above as to how the liner is held in place.

DSCN3655.jpg

Embossed in the crown of the helmet are a number of characters within a ring outline - not easy to read but identifiable markings are - 
NPA - National Plastics Aerospace?
2010 - date of manufacture?
60-1881 - perhaps a unique number for the shell?

 

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

CTT

CTT left.jpg

CTT right.jpg

CTT front.jpg

CTT rear.jpg

CTT overhead.jpg

CTT inner.jpg

CTT front pad.jpg

CTT screw.jpg

CTT liner label.jpg

CTT label rear.jpg

"This is a British "Helmet, SF, CTT". It is effectively a Mk7 or an AC900/600 but unlike the 900, it has formal designation and contract number which suggests these were/are produced and issued in some quantity. The only differences I can find are:-

- front liner head pad - this is cloth covered on this model whilst on the & and the 900 it has a soft leather covering

- the washers to the inner side bolts are black on this model (and the Mk7), whilst they're clear on the 900

- labels and designation - this model has a seperate liner label and a distict designation ("SF, CTT").

Unlike other AC variants there is no reference to "NP Aerospace" (or Courtaulds) and this is as per the Mk7 - whilst identically shaped helmets are detailed on the NP Aerospace website there is no reference to the SF CTT. As per other 900s, this one was originally black before having its outer custom camo applied."

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

CTT

Another example of the NP CTT helmet, showing its more usual black finish, and a little more detail of the chinstrap rig.  
The chinstrap is a much simpler three-point attachment as opposed to the more complex arrangement of the general-issue Mk7.

DSCN3639.jpg

DSCN3640.jpg

DSCN3641.jpg

DSCN3642.jpg

 

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

 NATIONAL PLASTICS AC100

National Plastics AC -100 006.jpg

National Plastics AC -100 004.jpg

National Plastics AC -100 007.jpg

National Plastics AC -100 001.jpg

National Plastics AC -100 005.jpg

National Plastics AC -100 012.jpg

National Plastics AC -100 002.jpg

National Plastics AC -100 014.jpg

National Plastics AC -100 009.jpg

National Plastics AC -100 011.jpg

National Plastics AC -100 003.jpg

National Plastics AC -100 013.jpg

"This AC/100 was bought a few years ago in a large surplus store which is located next to a large naval base in my home town, the owner of the Business could not shed any light on it's provenance other than it might be a "Police helmet or SAS"?

Other than this information and the pictures provided I have no evidence it was used by a Special Forces operative, however the National Plastics website at the time of purchase stated these models were used by British Special Forces, as well as sold to foreign countries for similar usage.

The helmet weighs in at 3489 grammes as it is shown. The cheek guards are removable as they are attached with Allen key bolts.The visor is also removable with the standard twist style fixing."

Photographs supplied by
GARY BICKELL

 

NATIONAL PLASTICS AC100/UL

Dated 1992, and obviously similar but not identical to other AC100 family products. The red 'warning' sticker possibly implies it was for civil rather than military use.

DSCN3202.JPG

DSCN3203.JPG

DSCN3204.JPG

DSCN3205.JPG

DSCN3206.JPG

DSCN3207.JPG

DSCN3210.JPG

DSCN3213.JPG

DSCN3209.JPG

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

NP AEROSPACE AC 100/600

AC100 profile.JPG

AC100 inner.JPG

AC100 front.JPG

AC100 rear.JPG

AC100 label.JPG

 Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

"The AC100/600 was designed in 1986 to meet the demanding requirements of Special Forces operations and is still successfully in operation with many forces today. It has a MkVI-esque liner and a raised "peak", presumably for Respirators and weapons sights. This product is specially designed to interface with respirators, communications / active noise reduction, goggles, night vision and visor assemblies. This mint un-issued example is Medium sized and weighs approximately 2.25kg."

 

AC 100 variant - specific designation unknown

GS1.jpg

GS2.jpg

Several detail differences between this and the known AC100/600 shown above - no blind rivet (for faceshield?) on side, minor differences to liner, colour....is this an early model, or something else entirely?

Photographs supplied by
PAUL BARNES

 

COURTAULDS AEROSPACE AC200

Note the Courtaulds label (dated 1997), not the commonly used NP Aerospace  - which was a part of the Courtaulds combine.

DSCN3010.JPG

DSCN3011.JPG

DSCN3017.JPG

DSCN3018.JPG

DSCN3012.JPG

DSCN3014.JPG

DSCN3016.JPG

DSCN3024.JPG

DSCN3023.JPG

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

  

NP AEROSPACE AC200/620

This variant of the 200 immediately above has the more usual NP Aerospace label and is dated 2001

It is very similar to the AC200 model, with minor differences, the most obvious being the lack of an extra plastic chinstrap fastener that was fitted to the original AC200 model.

DSCN3561.jpg

DSCN3562.jpg

DSCN3563.jpg

DSCN3564.jpg

DSCN3566.jpg

DSCN3565.jpg

DSCN3567.jpg

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

NP AEROSPACE AC200/650

NP AEROESPACE (4).JPG

NP AEROESPACE (2).JPG

NP AEROESPACE (1).JPG

NP AEROESPACE (3).JPG

NP AEROESPACE (5).JPG

NP AEROESPACE (6).JPG

see here for info on OSCE

Photographs supplied by
FERNANDO MEDINA

 

NP AEROSPACE AC200/650

DSCN3117.jpg

DSCN3118.jpg

DSCN3119.jpg

DSCN3120.jpg

DSCN3121.jpg

DSCN3122.jpg

DSCN3123.jpg

DSCN3127.jpg

"Another example of the AC200/650, claimed to have been used by UK Police. Size Large, weighs 1566g. Entire liner is held in with velcro strips, the bolts hold only the chinstrap rig. NB what looks like a German-type breakaway catch on the chinstrap is not, it is permenently fixed."

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

NP AC 600/575

This may not be a true - complete - 600/575 - please read notes below.

DSCN3623.jpg

DSCN3624.jpg

DSCN3625.jpg

DSCN3626.jpg

DSCN3628.jpg

DSCN3627.jpg

DSCN3633.jpg

There is something unusual about this helmet. The liner is loose and there is a mismatch between the Velcro fixing strips on the liner itself and those on the shell (different places, different number of corresponding velcro strips). The liner does not feel right - fits badly - when fitted into the shell. It is hard to believe it is the original liner.

As the makers label is affixed to the liner and not the shell it may be that this is not a 600/575 shell at all.

But see the three pictures immediately below - taken from an auction site in 2013 - which seem to show the same shell with a different liner but with a 600/575 label affixed to the shell itself.

There is a HIGH degree of uncertainty here - are there at least two versions of the 600/575?

NPAC600575 (1).JPGNPAC600575 (3).JPGNPAC600575 (4).JPG

Below, the shell without liner and the liner itself.

DSCN3629.jpg

DSCN3631.jpg

DSCN3635.jpg

DSCN3634.jpg

DSCN3637.jpg

DSCN3636.jpg

DSCN3638.jpg

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

NATIONAL PLASTICS EOD (Explosive Ordnance Disposal)

This helmet has a shell very similar to the (possible) AC600/575 shown above, but the liner and chinstrap are distinctly different.

See particularly the rubber rivet horns at the rear, familiar from the Mk6 and Mk6A helmets.

DSCN3753.jpg

DSCN3754.jpg

DSCN3757.jpg

DSCN3759.jpg

DSCN3758.jpg

DSCN3764.jpg

The mountings for a faceplate are bolted to the shell - two bolts each side. Very difficult to remove!
The green fabric strap, which had velcro pads on its interior side, may be related to faceplate use. Or then again it may not be. I have no real idea. It is present on ever example of this helmet I have seen so may be assumed to be a normal factory fitting.

DSCN3766.jpg

DSCN3765.jpg

DSCN3761.jpg

DSCN3762.jpg

The net crownpiece is adjustable by very long velcro tabs.
The right-hand picture shows the head of one of the very characteristic NP 'mushroom' rubber rivets, the exterior horns of which can be seen in the photographs above.

EOD HELMET LABEL.jpg

This label is from another identical helmet, not the one otherwise shown.

DSCN3760.jpg

Weight - 1396g. Assumed to be a medium size.
For comparison -
large UK Mk6 = 1452g
medium UK 6A = 1628g,

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

NP AEROSPACE NP9

0001a.jpg

0003a.jpg

0004a.jpg

0005a.jpg

DSC06314.JPG

Photographs supplied by
CHRIS JOHNSON

 "Purchased at a show in my home town York, PA, USA. It is obviously a British made helmet by National Plastics, the seller told me it was made for the Dutch military. I have no way of know if this is true."

 

NATIONAL PLASTICS NP9/OC

Dated 1991, this is very similar to the blue helmet shown above, acquired from the Netherlands so the supposition that it was intended for Dutch use seems correct, but there is no known evidence it was ever actually taken into service. See also the helmet immediately below.

DSCN3194.JPG

DSCN3195.JPG

DSCN3201.JPG

DSCN3196.JPG

DSCN3197.JPG

DSCN3199.JPG

 

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

NATIONAL PLASTICS NP9/OC

Lbel clearly reads NP9/OC. but this helmet is not the same as those show immediately above.

UK NP PASGT clone.jpg

UK NP PASGT clone in.jpg

UK NP PASGT clone label.jpg

Photographs supplied by
ROGER LUCY

 

AEGIS - commercial helmet.

S6303413.JPG

S6303416.JPG

S6303412.JPG

S6303415.JPG

 

Photographs supplied by
ARTHUR BENJAMINS

 

AEGIS HELMET

S6303388.JPG

S6303393.JPG

S6303390.JPG

S6303391.JPG

S6303392.JPG

Photographs supplied by
ARTHUR BENJAMINS

 

AEGIS ENGINEERING RAP 100

S6303424.JPG

S6303426.JPG

S6303421.JPG

S6303422.JPG

S6303427.JPG

S6303428.JPG

S6303418.JPG

S6303420.JPG

"A black nylon cover velcroed around a soft, ballistic cap that is placed on what looks like a vacuum formed liner. There is no discernable way of affixing the outer onto the inner. I have only seen three if these."

Photographs supplied by
ARTHUR BENJAMINS

 

AEGIS ENGINEERING  AP 19022

aegis 19022 (2).jpg

aegis 19022 (1).jpg

aegis 19022 (4).jpg

aegis 19022 (3).jpg

aegis 19022 (5).jpg

aegis 19022 (6).jpg

aegis 19022 (9).jpg

aegis 19022 (7).jpg

aegis 19022 (8).jpg

aegis 19022 (10).jpg

An unusual object, the AEGIS AP 19022, looking like the mutant offspring of a mating between a NP AC100 and a Mk6. The black colour and the red 'Warning' label imply police/security use rather than military issue. The partially obscured  label shown at bottom right contains technical information.

The chinstrap is a fairly common type including a push-pull plastic catch, but looks confused in these photographs as a previous owner chose to remove the retaining bolts from both left and right sides.

The applied rim is a fairly hefty rubber or thick plastic.

The helmet label is dated 1994, it is sized as an unusual  'medium - large', and the weight (except for two missing nuts&bolts) is a substantial 1698g, rather heavier than either a Mk6 large = 1452g  or a Mk6A large = 1628g

photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

BRISTOL ARMOUR helmets

Helmets from the early 1980s made by Bristol Composite Materials Engineering Ltd. Two of them were acquired by Canadian DND in 1984, presumably just for examination as they do not seem to have been used in the trials that the Orlites, PASGTs and Mk.6s were subjected to. The third one came from a surplus dealer in Belfast

UK Bristol Armour Grade 9.jpg

B.A. Grade 9 helmet.

UK Bristol Armour Grade 9 in.jpg

B.A. Grade 9 helmet.

 UK Bristol Composite Armour unkn trials in.jpg

B.A. unknown trials helmet.

UK Bristol Composite Armour unkn trials.jpg

B.A. unknown trials helmet.

UK Bristol Armour Grade 17.jpg

B.A. Grade 17 helmet.

UK Bristol Composite Armour Grade 17 in b.jpg

B.A. Grade 17 helmet.

UK Bristol Composite Armour Grade 17 in.jpg

B.A. Grade 17 helmet.

 UK Bristol Composite Armour Grade 17 label.jpg

B.A. Grade 17 helmet.

 

photographs supplied by
ROGER LUCY

 

BRISTOL ARMOUR  - Grade 9

A surprisingly light helmet - just 892g and it is possibly a Medium (label says '4') size. Note label in English and German.

DSCN3139.jpg

DSCN3140.jpg

DSCN3141.jpg

DSCN3144.jpg

DSCN3146.jpg

DSCN3145.jpg

DSCN3143.jpg

photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

BRISTOL ARMOUR - Grade 17

COMPARE WITH THE PRECEDING BRISTOL ARMOUR PRODUCTS

This is a rather unusual production from Bristol Armour, who seem to have been a subsidiary of British Petroleum, operating out of Bristol, England. They were active during the 1980s and presumably previously. but vanished in the early 1990s.

DSCN3528.jpg

DSCN3529.jpg

DSCN3530.jpg

DSCN3536.jpg

This specific helmet has a similar shape and form to other Bristol products (see immediately above) but it seems poorly made overall. The shell is thick and roughly made. The outside surface is rough overall, and it has a feel similar to a piece of (believe it or not) earthenware rather than a sophisticated ballistic plastic. It feels like a roof tile, in fact, and even has the same sort of dull ringing sound when tapped. Its actually hard to believe it really is plastic and not pottery.

DSCN3523.jpg

DSCN3533.jpg

DSCN3531.jpg

DSCN3535.jpg

The chinstrap obviously has its central part missing - compare to the blue example which has a complete chinstrap rig. The helmet also appears to have had a applied rim, probably similar to that on the blue one shown above, at some time. Long gone, along with the central chinstrap section.

DSCN3534.jpg

DSCN3532.jpg

See the strange rippling effect on the interior of the shell.

DSCN3525.jpg

DSCN3527.jpg

The liner is is a very simple bowl made of expanded polystyrene, with a very thin synthetic fabric liner. There is no sign it was glued in, and no sign of any fixative of any kind implies it was intended to hold by pressure and friction alone. The blue Bristol Grade 9 shown above has a similar liner, but it seems to be made of a more flexible and durable polythene-like material, and seems to be securely fixed, perhaps with glue!

DSCN3524.jpg

The label is hard to read in the photo because it is inside a sealed plastic envelope sewn to the liner. Apart from the makers name and address it includes GRADE - 17 and SIZE - 3. There is also a long ITEM PART number which when web-researched produced no result.

This helmet weighs a fairly hefty 1420g, and that's without a missing chinstrap section and its rim edge. That's actually more than a medium British GS Mk6 (1340g), and a lot more than the blue Bristol shown above, which is a distinct lightweight at 896g in complete state.

No date, though one might assume 1980s.

photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

BRISTOL - unknown type ?

This was filed in the USA section as an Unknown, but it has many characteristics in common with other Bristol armour products so UK seems more appropriate.

Possibly Police/Special Forces ?

Helmet3c.jpg

Helmet3d.jpg

Helmet3a.jpg

Helmet3b.jpg

"I don't know what this helmet is exactly, but I believe it's US-made, probably out of fiber glass. It is VERY heavy." 

Photographs supplied by
GENE T

 

GLOBAL ARMOUR PASCUT ASSAULT HELMET

PASCUT iv.JPG

PASCUT ii.JPG

PASCUT i.JPG

PASCUT iii.JPG

PASCUT v.JPG

"British Special Forces-used PASCUT ASSAULT HELMET ARMOUR LEVEL 3A.
The Global Armour PASCUT Assault Helmet is based upon the US Army's MICH Helmet, ACH (Advanced Combat Helmet) & Gentex helmets. Designed as a lighter and more compact version, with protruding ear coverage for communications fit whilst offering high calibre protection. It mixes high ballistic performance with low weight, using ballistic aramid fibre.
This example was used by a British soldier in Helmand Province."

 

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

Special Forces Helmet - KEJO?

 see also USA

Kejo side.jpg

Kejo front.jpg

Kejo rear.jpg

Kejo inner.jpg

Kejo label.jpg

Kejo side pad.jpg

"This cut-away helmet was used by a British SF operative in Afghanistan. It closely resembles the Sarker ALPHA side-cut helmet (strap differs), the Vestguard SF helmet and the Kejo SF helmet (liner differs). It's assumed to be the Kejo version as there is evidence of a label to the inner rear as per Kejo. The sand-coloured paint has worn off the black rubber edging but there's no evidence of the shell being any other colour previously. 

The liner pads are unusually thin and are attached to strips of Velcro rather than the usual discs / "coins" - however they have been in the helmet for some time and have experienced some wear. The shaped pads on the sides are very unusual but they fit the shape of the helmet. The 4-point harness has a soft rubber chin cup and adjustable nape strap. Even with these thin pads, this helmet still sits high on the head leaving the side of the head almost totally exposed." 

Weight 1.05kg

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

LBA INTERNATIONAL COMBAT HELMET

Lightweight Body Armour International product, though not obvious which one

S6303396.JPG

S6303399.JPG

S6303397.JPG

S6303398.JPG

S6303402.JPG

S6303401.JPG

"This is a British LBA helmet of an 'advisory' role. Apparently it came out of Iraq where the previous owner had put in MICH pads - hence their presence. It is weird that it has a 'belt-and-braces' crown pad and netting. Even in their website, there is no mention of this particluar model - especially of the half-netting that this version has."

 Photographs supplied by
ARTHUR BENJAMINS

 

LBA (Lightweight Body Armour) F6 Combat Helmet. 

LBA F6 side.jpg

LBA F6 side i.jpg

LBA F6 front.jpg

LBA F6 rear.jpg

LBA F6 9mm.jpg

LBA F6 inner.jpg

LBA F6 label.jpg

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

"This helmet has been used in a ballistics test and is from the LBA stable. The shell is PASGT-esque but without the hard lines at the sides. The liner on this version is sparse but functional. This one has been the subject of 3 tests (9mm x 2 and .357 x 1) - none have penetrated the shell. There is no confirmation that these tests were undertaken by LBA themselves. More information can be found at the LBA website.

It may be that 'F6' isn't a model number...perhaps more of a protection level  I guess as this doesn't look anything like my other F6 ! (see immediately below)

Weight (Large size) - 1.45kg"

http://www.lbainternational.com/LBAhelmets.pdf

LBA WEBSITE

 

LBA  badged as BULLDOG ARMOUR Armour F6 Mach 1

Bulldog profile.jpg

Bulldog front.jpg

Bulldog inner.jpg

Bulldog rear.jpg

Bulldog label.jpg

Bulldog inner detail.jpg

Bulldog LBA label.jpg

Bulldog overpaint label.jpg

Bulldog inner crown.jpg

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 "A Bulldog Armour F6 Mach 1 Helmet. The suppliers website claims that...... "the Bulldog helmet is aimed at the Special Forces, Military and Police Special Tactical Units". British Special Forces currently use this cut of helmet with the NIJ IIIA ballistic protection in Olive Drab.

This particular 2008-dated example has been sprayed-painted "sand" on the outside - it was intended for CPD work in Iraq. Upon closer inspection a "4" is visible behind the liner netting to the inner crown and an unusual rectangular deformity to the paint inside the helmet turned out to be an over-painted label from "LBA" ("Lightweight Body Armour") - see LBA helmet from Arthur Benjamins above.

This is actually an LBA helmet which appears to have been re-supplied by "Bulldog"."

 

BULLDOG? LBA? KEJO? HELMET

Has similarities to other known helmets but no proof as to its origins.

IMG_0380.jpg

IMG_0381.jpg

IMG_0382.jpg

IMG_0383.jpg

IMG_0384.jpg

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

"This is a British-used ballistic helmet, produced (or at least marketed) by the British company "Bulldog" although there are no markings on this example to substantiate this. It is designed to offer level 3a protection. It is claimed that this helmet was used extensively on combat operations in Afghanistan, by a member of the Elite Pathfinder Platoon and then by a member of 3 Commando Brigade Recce Force. It is fitted with a 7 point padding system and 4-point harness with molded plastic chin-cup. The pads themselves are thin and very similar to those in the "Kejo" cut-out helmet also on this site (the second Kejo helmet shown on the USA page) - these may simply come from the same source themselves or the helmets do (a similar blank label can be found to the inner rear of both).

Size - Large

Weight - 1.25kg

 

RBR COMBAT S4

"RBR Combat S4, which, as you can see from the comparative pictures (below), is identical to the italian Sistemi Compositi except it has no feathers.

UK RBR Combat S4.jpg

UK RBR Combat S4 in.jpg

UK RBR mark.jpg

Photographs supplied by
ROGER LUCY

IT Sistemi Compositi.jpg

Italian Sistema Compositi

IT Sistemi Compositi in.jpg

Italian Sistema Compositi

 

RBR BALLISTIC COMBAT HELMET F2

DSCN3579.jpg

DSCN3580.jpg

DSCN3581.jpg

DSCN3582.jpg

DSCN3583.jpg

DSCN3587.jpg

DSCN3585.jpg

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

RBR COMBAT HELMET F5

HPIM7238 (2).JPG

HPIM7240.JPG

HPIM7241 (2).JPG

HPIM7300.JPG

HPIM7296.JPG

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

RBR  S4 - export model?

Side.jpg

Front.jpg

Rear.jpg

RBR inner.jpg

Rim.jpg

Label.jpg

"...for the Brit section?..US section?...who owns RBR nowadays?...another RBR variant....it came from Poland and from the name on the back it looks like it was used "out East" for something...or by Eastern folk somewhere else?

Anyway, this is another RBR Ballistic Helmet. It's very similar to the green F5 model above but there are subtle differences:-

- the peak is less pronounced
- the rim piece is softer
- the inner liner shell is soft / pliable
- the outer surface is smooth
- the liner screws are different.

There is no evidence of green paint - it would seem that this was either white, or its current UN Blue. Weight - 1.3kg"

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

RBR F6

Helmet2a.jpg

Helmet2c.jpg

Helmet2e.jpg

Helmet2d.jpg

Helmet2b.jpg

Photographs supplied by
GENE T.

"The label is partially blacked out, but I think this is an RBR helmet, similar to the F5 model from Adrian Blake. The heavy ballistic face shield came with the helmet."

Confirmed to be an RBR F6 by Aleksandr Solovjov.

 

RBR COMBAT HELMET F6

"A 1998 dated example of the RBR F6 helmet. A thick heavy (1.58kg) shell, which appears to have been over-painted black if the scuffs on the rim piece are anything to go by although this may be restricted to the edge itself. Very similar inside to the blue ("export") example and the shell is the same as the LBA F6 white test rig in this section...which is hardly surprising as LBA acquired RBR in March 2001. The shell itself has a fixed thick inner shell lining but the same basic suspension straps as found in many of the composites of it's time. This version has a green webbing 3-point harness."

RBR F6 side.jpg

RBR F6 front.jpg

RBR F6 inside.jpg

RBR F6 rear.jpg

RBR F6 Label.jpg

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

RBR DEFENDER F6

RBR F6 AB (1).jpg

RBR F6 AB (2).jpg

RBR F6 AB (3).jpg

RBR F6 AB (4).jpg

 "LBA (they took over RBR) describe this helmet as "a unique style of ballistic helmet, which introduces improved comfort and fit when using ear defenders". They also claims that it was "originally developed for the Swedish army (Hjalm 90)".

It is the classic MICH shaped shell, albeit more flared at the sides, with basic liner (front and rear padded sections with velcro adjusted side pieces) and 3-point black webbing harness with chin cup. This particular example clearly started life black and has been painted both outside and inside, leaving the label exposed via masking. The inner shell of this example has self-adhesive velcro strips attached suggesting that it may have once been fitted with pads but the original liner has been re-fitted. It is not standard British Army issue.

Weight ("dressed") - 1.62kg"

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

RBR S4 POLICE RIOT HELMET

not really a military composite helmet, obviously, but from a Known Producer.

DSCN3027.JPG

DSCN3029.JPG

DSCN3028.JPG

DSCN3030.JPG

DSCN3032.JPG

DSCN3026.JPG

DSCN3034.JPG

DSCN3031.JPG

DSCN3033.JPG

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

'SPECIAL FORCES' helmet - possibly by RBR

HPIM7242 (2).JPG

HPIM7244.JPG

HPIM7243.JPG

HPIM7289.JPG

 

 Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

TETRANIKE APH9

see also as used by Norway

The APH9 has an extraordinarily simple and possibly ineffective chinstrap secured only by a single strip of Velcro.

DSCN3606.jpg

DSCN3608.jpg

DSCN3607.jpg

DSCN3603.jpg

DSCN3602.jpg

DSCN3601.jpg

DSCN3610.jpg

 

 

TETRANIKE/LIGHTWEIGHT BODY ARMOUR

From the label this is 'Helmet Type PP H6" It seems to be the same basic shell as the Tetranike illustrated above, but the liner, chinstrap and rivet placement are distinctly different.

TETRANIKE LBA (1).jpg

TETRANIKE LBA (5).jpg

Is very nose-heavy.

TETRANIKE LBA (3).jpg

TETRANIKE LBA (2).jpg

This is a metal thread set into the shell, probably for a visor fitting.

TETRANIKE LBA (6).jpg

The leather band is apparently fitted for the forehead only, there is no sign that a section is missing from the rear of the headband.

TETRANIKE LBA (9).jpg

TETRANIKE LBA (4).jpg

TETRANIKE LBA (11).jpg

TETRANIKE LBA (7).jpg

The chinstrap is secured to the shell with simple pop-studs. Unusual.

TETRANIKE LBA (8).jpg

Very simple artificial fibre chinstrap with vinyl chincup.

TETRANIKE LBA (10).jpg

No size shown, looks to be a medium at best, but it is heavy - 1454g, compared to 1390g for a late-production medium Mk6. It also has the same brick-like ceramic feel as a Bristol helmet detailed above.

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

THETFORD MOULDED PRODUCTS helmet - used in Northern Ireland.

x 057a-WEB.jpg

x 060a-WEB.jpg

x 059a-WEB.jpg

x 063-WEB.jpg

x 062-WEB.jpg

x 064-WEB.jpg

Note that chinstrap assembly appears identical to that of first model UK para  helmet (see above).

Photographs supplied by
ERIC LACAZE

 

THETFORD RIOT HELMET - "HELMET, COMBAT, N.I. PATTERN"

TP Riot Profile i.jpg

TP Riot Profile.jpg

TP Riot Front.JPG

TP Riot Rear.jpg

TP Riot Buckle.jpg

TP Riot Visor bolt.jpg

TP Riot Inner open.jpg

TP Riot Inner.jpg

TP Riot material.jpg

TP Riot Visor nut.jpg

TP Riot Visor Cover Label.jpg

TP Riot Helmet Label.jpg

TP Riot bag.jpg

TP Riot Bag Label.jpg

"This is another lightweight British helmet made by Thetford moulded products.

Despite looking very similar to the Parachutist version this one, the “Helmet, Combat, NI Pattern” (Northern Ireland) is quite different. Key differences are:-

different shell shape, flared over the ears

visor attachment nuts/bolts (+ visor [detachable])

the liner does not have the clear plastic laced flaps and padded black headband - this one is more basic

the green vinyl strap has a metal buckle in place of the green plastic one

the shell material is more coarse, resembling Glass Reinforced Plastic in places 

This particular example is complete with DPM-pattern cloth visor cover and original carrying bag."

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

THETFORD N.I. HELMET - the first two images are of a comparatively unusual black example - not painted but moulded in black material.

THETFORD NI BLACK (1).jpg

THETFORD NI BLACK (2).jpg

Shown below is the more usual green shell. Useful detail pictures.

THETFORD NI GREEN (1).jpg

THETFORD NI GREEN (4).jpg

THETFORD NI GREEN (5).jpg

THETFORD NI GREEN (3).jpg

THETFORD NI GREEN (2).jpg

Photographs supplied by
RICHARD JONES

 

PROTECH helmet - in UK military service?

HPIM7841.JPG

HPIM7847.jpg

HPIM7842.JPG

HPIM7843.JPG

HPIM7844.JPG

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

"This helmet is a heavy-shelled MICH-pattern (peak-less) with a 4 point harness and what is fast becoming standard non-pad liner, closely resembling, in design at least, the British Mk6A although materials are different.

It's been painted an overall sand colour (the underlying original colour is not clear but it's assumed to be black. It is not standard issue in the British army so it's assumed it was a private purchase.

This helmet came from Hereford and is said to have served in both Iraq and Afghanistan although it's condition can only suggest that it has been extremely well cleaned internally and cared for since - this sheds a little doubt on it's claimed "active service".

The adhesive paper label inside states it's made by Protech Armored Products (Massachusetts, USA) - this label is also in remarkably good condition for a helmet said to have been used in service. The inner crown is marked "SDS L-23A". It is an American helmet but in British use."

 

UNITED SHIELD PST SC650

This example was originally posted in the UNKNOWN page but was eventually discovered to be a United Shield product. Label shown here, taken from an Ebay listing.

738192120_o.jpg

A black - usually meaning police or other non-military use - helmet but with some traces of a green finish showing through the scuffs and scratches. Well used. Very nose-heavy, as the photographs show. Many liner elements held in with velcro.

Many similarities to NP or RBR products. No markings of any kind, although there was once a label removed by some determinedly unhelpful person.

Note especially the unusual plastic breakaway catch, also the comparatively unusual liner bolts.

DSCN3219.JPG

DSCN3218.JPG

DSCN3220.JPG

DSCN3221.JPG

DSCN3214.JPG

DSCN3215.JPG

DSCN3216.JPG

DSCN3222.JPG

DSCN3217.JPG

 Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

M.L.A. SC650 Commando

This is a commercial product sold to Special Forces and Police forces. Black composite shell with padded front and rear liner. 4 point harness with split strap chin-cup. 'M.L.A.' is actually Michael Lupton Associates which is a supplier rather than manufacturer; their helmets are very similar if not identical to those with a similar 'SC650' designation badged as UNITED SHIELD, SECOND CHANCE, or others. See immediately above, for example.

Size - Medium    Weight - 1.41kg

MLA SC650 Side.jpg

MLA SC650 Inner.jpg

MLA SC650 Front.jpg

MLA SC650 Rear.jpg

MLA SC650 Label.jpg       united shield second chance.jpg

Label on left from this MLA helmet, on right an example showing 'Second Chance' as supplier.
It is most likely that these helmets are actually made by United Shield, which has establishments in both the British Isles and the USA.

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE

 

VESTGUARD ACH-PASGT

This is Vestguard's "Advanced Combat Helmet - PASGT". Vestguard is a UK producer/distrubutor of helmets, body armour etc. This helmet is different to that shown immediately below in that the lateral bulges are more pronounced, the edging is thicker and more square and it has a 3 point harness (and therefore 5 liner "bolts" rather than 4). It is available in other colours (UN Blue, Sand, Green). 

Size - Large  Weight - 1.52kg

Vestguard PASGT Side.jpg

Vestguard PASGT Inner.jpg

Vestguard PASGT Front.jpg

Vestguard PASGT Rear.jpg

Vestguard PASGT Label.jpg

 

 

VESTGUARD UK PASGT clone
a commercial helmet produced by an English company based in Essex

DSCN2880.JPG

DSCN2881.JPG

DSCN2884.JPG

DSCN2883.JPG

 VESTGUARD WEBSITE

Photographs supplied by
GREG PICKERSGILL

 

Jack Ellis PST H10

"Jack Ellis supplies Helmets and Body Armour from their company in Scotland, UK. This helmet (labelled PST H10although listed as SC650/427 on their web site) came back from 'Afghan' and was believed to have been used by Contractors or SF. It's pretty much identical to the MLA 650 / Commando helmet. Indeed, an internet search reveals several distributors (presumably not manufacturers?) of 650's including United Shield (PSTSC650). This one has the usual lightweight basic liner found in most of the commercial PASGT-variants but also has an unusual label partially exposed in the crown.

According to the JE website they're available in black and blue.

Size - Large Weight - 1.5kg"

The suspicion  is that this helmet, like some others, is not designed and manufactured by the company selling it, but is essentially identical to several other commcial products available in the British Isles and USA, and produced at one facility and badged for retail by outside sellers. The RBR/United Shield company is probably the originator.

JE Side.jpg

JE 3_4.jpg

JE Front.jpg

JE Inner.jpg

JE Rear.jpg

JE Label 1.jpg

JE Label 2.jpg

Photographs supplied by
ADRIAN BLAKE